Line Stone, Skyreholme, Appletreewick, North Yorkshire

Cup-Marked Stone:  OS Grid Reference – SE 0732 6251

Also Known as:

  • Carving no.401 (Boughey & Vickerman)

Getting Here

Skyreholme 401 carving (photo © Richard Stroud)

Skyreholme 401 carving (photo © Richard Stroud)

Along the B6265 Pateley Bridge-Grassington road, roughly halfway between Stump Cross Caverns and the turn down to Skyreholme and Appletreewick (New Lane) is a dirt-track on your right-hand side called Black Hill Road. Walk along here for a few hundred yards till y’ reach the gate on the right. A track meanders downhill to the psilocybin-rich pastures of Nussey Green. Several hundred yards down, to the right-hand side of the track, we find this stone and its several nearby companions. Look around – you’ll find it!

Archaeology & History

I like this carving — I think because of the initial impression it gave, which was one of numeracy and linearity: an unusual quality for a cup-and-ring stone. Those of you with an astronomical or mathematical slant may have a similar response.

Line Stone Carving, Skyreholme

Line Stone Carving, Skyreholme

The stone was first described in one of Stuart Feather’s (1964) many short notices.  Its existence then remained dormant until it was eventually listed in Boughey & Vickerman’s (2003) fine survey on the West Riding rock-art, where they catalogued it as ‘stone no.401.’  The carving comprises of two parallel lines — one quite deep— with cup-marks at either end; one of the lines having another 2 cups along it. A third line at an angle has one or two cups along it aswell.  Several other single cups scatter the rock (forgive my crap drawing of it!).

References:

Boughey, Keith & Vickerman, E.A., Prehistoric Rock Art of the West Riding, WYAS 2003.
Feather, Stuart, ‘Appletreewick (WR),’ in Yorkshire Archaeology Journal 41, 1964.

© Paul Bennett, The Northern Antiquarian

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Skyreholme Wall Stone, Appletreewick, North Yorkshire

Cup-and-Ring Stone:  OS Grid Reference – SE 0772 6231

Also Known as:

  1. Carving no.413 (Boughey & Vickerman)

Getting Here

Skyreholme Wall Carving

Skyreholme Wall Carving (after Boughey & Vickerman)

Various ways here, but for the sake of newcomers I’d say it was best following directions from Burnsall.  From here, take the Appletreewick road thru the village, past the left turn a few hundred yards along, and another 500 yards or so there’s a split in the road: take the one on your right!  Follow this up, keeping right (don’t turn into Perceval Hall, tempting though it may be!) and park-up where the road turns into a track.  Walk up the track, past the haunted junction, bearing left uphill up Black Hill Road until you reach the very peak of the track where, in the walling on your left, you’ll see this big boulder.  If you can’t see it, you’re bloody close!

Archaeology & History

This is at the very peak of Black Hill Road, with excellent views of Simon’s Seat climbing to the immediate south, the prominent and rounded Nursery Knot Hill immediately north, and grand views to peaks east and west. It is very likely this position had something to do with it being deemed worthy of relevance.  The rock itself defines a point along the old boundary line.

Skyreholme Wall Boundary carving

Skyreholme Wall Boundary carving

One peculiarity on this boulder is the deep cup-mark with a strange ‘lip’ to it, which has been mentioned by others in the past.  This is surrounded by at least five others cups — not dissimilar to some of the ‘rosary-designs’ of cup-and-rings further north.

The rock art student’s Boughey & Vickerman’s (2003) drawing of this design is pretty accurate — where they call it stone 413 — though it doesn’t actually give this carving the justice it deserves.  They also erroneously tell that some of the cups here are doubtful.

Check it out for y’self.  This is an excellent stone for cup-and-ring lovers! (with plenty of other sites scattered about all round here)

References:

  1. Boughey, Keith & Vickerman, E.A., Prehistoric Rock Art of the West Riding, WYAS 2003.

© Paul Bennett, The Northern Antiquarian

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Currer Woods Stone, Steeton, West Yorkshire

Cup-and-Ring Stone:  OS Grid Reference – SE 0251 4384

Getting Here

On the opposite side of the road (B6265) from Airedale General Hospital, Steeton, you’ll notice a footpath going up the field into some woods.  Go up here.  Once you come out the top of the woods, follow the dodgy path on your right (west) along the rocky edges for 250 yards, following the edges of the field walling.  You’ll eventually reach the field with lots of rocks in it.  It’s the field before this one, close to the walling.  Look around!

Archaeology & History

I’ve been a little cautious about putting this carving on TNA simply because it seems to be an isolated example and was a little unsure about its veracity.  If I’d have found the stone on the edges of Ilkley Moor, Rivock Edge, or the heights above Askwith, I wouldn’t have hesitated.  The fact that no other carvings occur nearby has been my main trouble.  But I suppose if the carving turns out to be nowt of the sort, I can discard it at a future date and, of course, make sure that a lot of other cup-and-ring stones are disregarded at the same time (there are a number of other designs much less defined than this one which have been okayed by archaeo’s who’ve been into this subject for much shorter periods of time than myself).  But less of the waffle!

Currer Wood Carving, Steeton

Currer Wood Carving, Steeton

When we first found this, in April 2009, I was out looking for the remains of an old well (called Jane Well, a few hundred yards west of here).  The heaven’s opened and I ended up in the woodland and then found the field full of large rocks, some seemingly used by man in more recent centuries, atop of the woods, and so had to check them out!  But this was one of the first stones we found.

Currer Woods Stone

Currer Woods Stone

The rock itself, as the photo shows, appears to have had one end of it split or broken off (not unlike one edge of the Hanging Stones, Ilkley Moor) at some time in the past, intruding on the arc, or line, beneath which are two distinct ‘cups’.  A possible third cup-marking and other linear aspects seem apparent, with the design giving the distinct impression of a face.  I keep meaning to go back and get a rubbing of the carving, but aint got round to it yet.  When (if!) I gerrit done, I’ll add it onto this profile.

And although there are said to be no other prehistoric remains close to this old carving, the fields a coupla hundred yards west used to be called the Barrow Fields, where tombs were once found; and a little further along the same geological ridge atop of the excellent Kirk rocks, possible cup-markings scatter the edges of two sections — but they’re a little dubious; then there’s the Dragon Stone and associated cup-marked stone not far away.  In the adjacent woods are the remains of old walling, but I’ve not found other carvings hereabouts.  However, the rule tends to be: “where there’s one, there are more!”

Watch this space!

© Paul Bennett, The Northern Antiquarian

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Addlebrough Cup-Mark, Thornton Rust Moor, North Yorkshire

Cup-Marked Stone:  OS Grid Reference – SD 948 879

Getting Here

This takes a bitta getting to and won’t really be worthwhile unless you’re a rock-art nut!  I s’ppose if you’re looking at the other decent cup-and-ring stones on the summit of Addlebrough, it might be worth looking at.  In which case, walk a coupla hundred yards southeast towards where the walling meets and climb over.  The walk a little further in the same direction and once you’ve gone less than 100 yards, look around.  You can’t really miss it if you potter about.

Archaeology & History

Single cup-marked stone (photo by Richard Stroud)

Single cup-marked stone (photo by Richard Stroud)

This possible single cup-marked stone appears to have been discovered before me ‘n Richard Stroud got to the spot, by none other than Stan Beckensall himself — or at least it’s in Stan’s Prehistoric Rock Art of County Durham, Swaledale and Wensleydale book, where he describes it as it only can be done: “a single possible cup-marked stone…SSE of the summit cairn”, which is where you find this. (Another single cup-marked stone found nearby by Barbara Brown aint the same one as this.)

References:

Beckensall, S. & Laurie, T., Prehistoric Rock Art of County Durham, Swaledale and Wensleydale, County Durham Books 1998.

© Paul Bennett, The Northern Antiquarian

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Old Market Cross, Sedbergh, Cumbria

Cross (destroyed):  OS Grid Reference – SD 657 921

Archaeology & History

More than 150 years ago outside St. Andrew’s Church in Sedbergh, A.E. Platt wrote (1876) that,

“there was a cross standing in the Market Place adjoining the churchyard on the north, but the last remains of it, and the stone steps it stood on, were taken away some years since by private persons, and may now be seen used as gateposts to a farmyard, some ten miles from their original position.”

Intriguing stuff!  Does anyone know which farmyard might still possess these old relics?  When the legendary Harry Speight (1892: 443) ventured by here fifteen years later he knew little about their new location, but simply echoed what Platt had previously written.  It’d be good to know what has become of them…

References:

  1. Platt, A.E., The History of the Parish and Grammar School of Sedbergh, Yorkshire, Atkinson & Pollitt: Kendal 1876.
  2. Speight, Harry, The Craven and Northwest District Highlands, Elliot Stock: London 1892.

© Paul Bennett, The Northern Antiquarian

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Pathway Stone, Holden, Silsden, West Yorkshire

Cup-Marked Stone:  OS Grid Reference – SE 0704 4496

Getting Here

Follow the footpath running from the Rivock TV mast northwest, where it cuts diagonally across the field, heading towards the drystone wall.  About 200 yards before the walling – stop! It’s just to your right-hand side, very close by!

Pathway Stone, Holden, Rivock

Archaeology & History

First discovered in July 2009 when the hardworking Keighley volunteer, Michala Potts of Bracken Bank, did further rovings round the long grasses hereabouts.  Its name comes from the fact that it’s found just next to the footpath that cuts across Rough Holden from the TV mast beneath Rivock.  The carving’s a very simple plain design, as the photos show, with just three faded cup-markings etched onto the stones northeast face.

Close-up of cup-markings

Close-up of cup-markings

This stone aint too far from the cup-marked Dump Stone and the nearby Rough Holden design, but all across the Holden Rough grasslands are the faded remains of old pit-workings.  It makes you wonder just how many other carvings once existed here.  The fact that this and the other ones nearby still remain is damn lucky!

© Paul Bennett, The Northern Antiquarian

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Dane’s Stone, Moulin, Pitlochry, Perthshire

Standing Stone:  OS Grid Reference – NN 9425 5942

Also Known as:

  1. Pitfourie Stone

Getting Here

Dane's Stone under a brilliant sky

Dane’s Stone under a brilliant sky

Going thru Pitlochry town, turn up the A924 road for about a mile till you hit the Moulin Inn on your left-hand side.  Just past here, take the road left and continue for 2-300 yards until the stone in the field stands out on your right-hands side.  Y’ can’t really miss it!

Archaeology & History

I should mebbe have this site entered as a ‘stone circle’ and not just an old monolith, as numerous other standing stones were in close attendant not too long ago and it was said to have been a circle.   Certainly when the great Fred Coles (1908) talked about this place, he

“was informed by the tenant, Mr Reid…that many years ago, in his grandfather’s time, “there were several more stones standing”, all smaller than this monolith and that, upon the orders given by Mrs Grant Ferguson of Baledmund, some of these were saved from total demolition, and are supposed to be lying half-buried in the field to this day.”

...and here's the big man close-up

…and here’s the big man close-up

Though I imagine these remnants have now been removed.  Aerial images, when conditions are just right, might prove fruitful here.

But the solitary stone still standing here is quite a big fella.  Heavily encrusted with quartz and more than 7 feet tall, it’s a nice fat chunky thing, with its lower half being somewhat slimmer than the top.  Well worth having a look at!

Folklore

Once an old moot site, folklore also tells that an old market was once held here (there was some other folklore I had of this place, but can’t for the life of me find it at the moment!).

References:

  1. Coles, Fred R., ‘Report on Stone Circles Surveyed in Perthshire,’ in PSAS 42, 1908.
  2. Liddell, Colin, Pitlochry: Heritage of a Highland District, PKPL: Perth 1993.
  3. Reid, A., ‘Monumental Remains in Pitlochry District,’ in PSAS 46, 1912.

Links:

  1. Stravaiging Round Scotland
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