Spell Howe, Folkton, East Yorkshire

Tumulus:  OS Grid Reference – TA 065 788

Archaeology & History

This once impressive tumulus a half-mile east of the village* was first mentioned in the Bardney Cartulary in the early 13th century, where is was written as Spelhou.  Suggested by Olof Anderson (1934) to have been an early moot site — “the meeting place of the Torbar Hundred” — this appears to be confirmed in Smith’s (1937) etymological analysis where he ascribes Spell Howe to be literally, “‘Speech mound’, from OE spell, speech and haugr” (burial mound).

References:

Anderson, O.S., The English Hundred-Names, Lunds Universitets Arsskrift 1934.
Mortimer, J.R., Forty Years Researches in British and Saxon Burial Mounds of East Yorkshire, Brown & Sons: Hull 1905.
Smith, A.H., The Place-Names of the East Riding of Yorkshire and York, Cambridge University Press 1937.

* imprisoned in private grounds; unsure whether the owners are friendly or miserable; someone let us know if y’ can!

© Paul Bennett, The Northern Antiquarian

About megalithix

Occultist, prehistorian and independent archaeological researcher, specializing in prehistoric rock art, Neolithic, Bronze Age & Iron Age sites, and the animistic cosmologies of pre-Christian & traditional cultures.
This entry was posted in Cairns, Tombs, Tumuli, Yorkshire, East and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Spell Howe, Folkton, East Yorkshire

  1. Sally Brown says:

    My parents have just bought the property at Spell Howe. We are super friendly and your more than welcome to come and see and talk about the mound.
    Please do send me an email if you would like any more information.

    Many thanks.

    Sally. X

  2. megalithix says:

    Huge apologies for the late reply Sally. I only check in here every now & again since I moved over the new website – https://www.thenorthernantiquarian.org/ – so I hope you can forgive me.

    Also, a huge thanks re access to the Spell Howe mound. There are many round your area, as I’m sure you know – and one of these days I’d love to visit a big cluster of them. :)

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