Holy Well, Eccleshill, Bradford, West Yorkshire

Holy Well:  OS Grid Reference – SE 1878 3622

Getting Here

Take the A658 road north out of Bradford, past Undercliffe, and downhill towards Greengates.  When you meet with the large junction where Ravenscliffe Avenue turns to your right – stop!  Immediately on the left-hand side of the road is where the old well used to appear.

Archaeology & History

Old map showing Eccleshill's Holy Well

Old map showing Eccleshill’s Holy Well

In times past this was one of the most renowned holy wells in the region (we have at least 200 in West Yorkshire). First recorded as a holy well in 1585, specialist writer Edna Whelan remembers the waters here running into a stone trough at the side of Harrogate Road when she was young.

In 1932, local historian W.E. Preston described, “the remains of what was once a fine grove of trees leading up the hillside from the road to its source,” implying ritual commemoration and a procession to the site.  Today, this grove is still evidenced by the straight footpath across the main road, leading to the infamous Ravenscliffe estate.

In 1704 a court case was brought against some locals – Mr & Mrs Richard and Sarah White (and their daughter, Mary) – “for diverting the water from its ancient channel.”

In 1867 it was described in the Object Name Book:

“A considerable and well-known spring, it has the appearance of having been a bathing place. A bank has been thrown up on the east side, and a broken wall remains on the other sides. There is no tradition about it. It is likely to have been of some note…in the days of Romanism. Large trees are ranged on either side of the approach to it, forming a grove.”

Up till 1978, Andrea Smith (n.d.) reported the well to still be “protected by local tradition,” but this is no longer possible. Yorkshire Water don’t particularly give a damn about its preservation (water is money folks!) and today it’s covered by a man-hole in the garden.

References:

  1. Preston, William E., ‘Notes on the Early History of the Manor of Eccleshill,’ in Bradford Antiquary, 5, 1912.
  2. Preston, William E., ‘Some Local Holy Wells,’ in Bradford Antiquary, June 1932.
  3. Smith, Andrea, ‘Holy Wells Around Leeds, Bradford & Pontefract,’ in Wakefield Historical Journal 9, 1982.
  4. Whelan, Edna & Taylor, Ian, Yorkshire Holy Wells and Sacred Springs, Northern Lights: Pocklington 1989.

© Paul Bennett, The Northern Antiquarian

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About megalithix

Occultist, prehistorian and independent archaeological researcher, specializing in prehistoric rock art, Neolithic, Bronze Age & Iron Age sites, and the animistic cosmologies of pre-Christian & traditional cultures.
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4 Responses to Holy Well, Eccleshill, Bradford, West Yorkshire

  1. lowergate says:

    The place-name Eccleshill means the ‘church hill’. This Celtic word is derived from the British form of Latin – Ecclesia -and implies the existance of some sort of ‘British/Celtic’ population centre with organised worship in Romano-British & pre-Roman times.

  2. Nigel Peck says:

    Thanks for cataloguing these important sites. When the earth and her people are once again considered more important than profits, I look forward to these sites being re-established in their former glory. Keep up the great work.

  3. I grew up a stone’s throw away, on Ravenscliffe Estate and never knew.
    Fascinating. Albert Denzler

  4. sunbright57 says:

    Thanks Paul for bringing this former well to our attention.

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